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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the united states they have to meet the requirements of many different countries laws, and sometimes it is difficult to become a supplier to a high brand-name a anchor tenant because they don't want to have their brand integrity challenge door product challenge and they are trying to deliver the best product at the best point possible to get more market share and global dominance. so when we talk of a trusted suppliers that one set of suppliers and that's another set of getting into the to process these are both very important. >> dennis was speaking from mississippi in case you couldn't tell from my accent. when you're eating cat fish you don't know if it came from the delta or the vietnam. the food source is truly global but with extending that to deny what you just a little bit further we do have the food and drug administration, the united states department of agriculture regulations, and so to extend your analogy is there a role for regulation in cyberspace? what are the proper roles as melissa mentioned the policy levers to read this is to each of the panelists. >> as i said at
. defying the laws of history, we did just that. we gathered the exiles. we store our -- restored our independence and rebuild our life. the jewish people have come home. we will never be uprooted again. [applause] yom kippur.as your income f we have come together on this day of reflection and atonement. we take stock of our past. we pray for our future. we remembered are persecution -- our persecution. we remember the great travails of our dispersion. we mourn the extermination of 6 million people in the holocaust. but at the end of this holiday, we celebrate the birth of israel. we celebrate the terrorism of our young men and women who defended -- heroism of our younn and women who defended israel. in israel, we walk the same paths tried by abraham and jacob. we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel, the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately, that is not the case in many other countries. today, a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of maternity seek a bright future -- modernity seek a bright
argued before the court thinks he'll do it gradually. >> he's not trying to move the law radically quickly. i think justice scalia or justice thomas really want to get to the end answer as quickly as possible and make the law conform to what they really understand. whereas the chief justice is more incrementalist. >> reporter: but conservative court watcher doesn't believe anything wl chan any time soon. >> certainly this is not a crusading conservative court. until we have a shift i think in the membership of the court, it's impossible to call it a court that leans more to the left or to the right. >> and, wolf, for those opinions that could be close five-to-four decisions close attention will also be paid to justice kennedy who is frequently the swing vote in some of the toughest cases. >> going to be some very important cases coming up. joe, thanks very, very much. let's dig a bit deeper right now with our senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. his new book entitled "the oath" debuts this week atumber five on the "new york times" best seller list. congratulations, jeff. good work.
're looking for blasphemy laws, in other words it would be illegal to be critical of the prophet or critical of islam. that's what they're arguing. that's what morsi, who's taking $2 billion, is lecturing us that we must do and our president is pandering and apologizing for a film he had nothing to do with. >> i see him condemning the lack of tolerance it. i think that's a really important -- >> sean: wait a second. the lack of tolerance comes from the president himself, and the left, basically making an argument on behalf of or explaining the way the actions you saw in the middle east. they're basically saying, look, this is why it happened. it happened because people said mean things. the truths is, if you care about the first amendment, the freedom to say what you think, to express your opinion, you unequivocally the right for people to say unpopular things and not get killed for it. >> no, no, tucker, i think you actually affirm the first amendment, but you also have the right and you reserve the right to condemn when -- >> sean: alexis, why did the president -- and hillary, his administ
, they can become permanent residents, i think that's a mistake. we have to follow the law and insist those that have come here legally -- >> we'll ask presidential historian douglas brinkley after the break. don't go away. does your phone give you all day battery life ? droid does. and does it launch apps by voice while learning your voice ? launch cab4me. droid does. keep left at the fork. does it do turn-by-turn navigation ? droid does. with verizon, america's largest 4g lte network, and motorola, droid does. get $100 off select motorola 4g lte smartphones like the droid razr. it's got that sweet honey taste. but no way it's 80 calories, right? no way, right? lady, i just drive the truck. right, there's no way right, right? have a nice day. [ male announcer ] 80 delicious calories. fiber one. ♪ [ male announcer ] every car we build must make adrenaline pump and pulses quicken. ♪ to help you not just to stay ale... but feel alive. the new c class is no exception. it's a mercedes-benz through and through. see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-
will be conducted here under 19th century italian law. the first session is scheduled to last three hours. if found guilty, gabriele faces up to four years in jail, a sentence that would be served out in an italian prison, since the vatican has no jail of its own. gabriele saw himself as an agent of the holy spirit and wanted to clean up what he saw as evil and corruption in the headquarters of the roman catholic church. but many vatican watchers think the case goes much deeper. >> i can't find anyone who really believes that the pope's butler is solely responsible, that he concocted this scheme of stealing papers, of the pope. >> the most significant involved allegations of nep on totism, corruption and cronyism. others concerned the vatican's bank, which has suffered several scandals in the past. the butler scandal will be covered by a pool of eight reporters. no cameras will be allowed. only about 30 trials a year are held in the small courtroom, mainly for pickpocketing in st. peter's square. the trial is held on saturday because the judges and prosecutors all work in the italian judicial syste
, to her credit, has immediately initiated what already exists under the law, a formal inquiry with one of our most respected independent diplomatic figures, ambassador tom pickering, former undersecretary. he is heading this up and they will get the answers. i'm absolutely confident about that. what the republicans ought to be doing is not turning the tragedy of chris stevens' death -- this means something to us. chris stevens worked on our committee. he worked for dick lugar. he was a pearson fellow. he was a terrific ambassador representing our country. he cared about libya. he was committed to libya. and what are the republicans doing? all they can do is see the politics in this. they can't see how are we going to make sure that libya continues down the road to democracy and that those 30,000 libyans who stormed the militia headquarters and stole the weapons, are backed up over the next days in efforts that will help them make libya the libya we all want it to be. that's the question here. but all the republicans can do or see is politics. >> speaking of -- >> all they can see is ex
of law. douglas kennedy is live in our newsroom here in new york on that. what did you find out, douglas. >> there are currently 725 convicted criminals on death row in california. now some state residents want all of their lives spared, and they are getting support from a famous prosecutor. >> the $184 million that the death penalty is costing, it's a total waste of money. it's flushing it down the toilet. >> gil garcetti spent 32 years inside the los angeles district attorney's office. >> you prosecuted dozens of death penalty cases. >> we did. we not just prosecuted them but we convicted most of them. >> but garcetti has since changed his mind about giving fell ons the ultimate punishment. he says death penalty cases are simply too expensive and he says he knows from personal experience there is a lot of room for error. >> killing people is a huge responsibility and the criminal justice system isn't always perfect. >> it's not, unfortunately. we are dealing with human beings, so there is fallibility right? >> garcetti is supporting prop 34, which would eliminate the death penalty in c
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)